Our churnalism tool is used to see whether an article is simply a copy-paste exercise, or if there is a level of originality to the piece. Churn stats does the hard work for you by visualizing this data. Use this tool to determine the level of churnalism found across media houses and individual journalists and see who has the highest level of churn (most copied content) and who has the lowest level of churn (most original content).

Please note that in some cases, pieces may be fully reproduced but are not churn – these are often instead attributed to wire or agency copy. We are working on ways of extracting this data from the stats and to get a sense of how much content is from these other agencies or places.

Levels of churnalism over time


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The above graphic represents levels of churnalism from media houses over the time period specified. Here, we are looking at the levels of churnalism on a monthly basis. The level of churnalism can be defined as the number of articles that qualify as ‘churnalised’ in a given period compared to the total number of articles for that same period.



Top 10 Highest/Lowest Levels of Churnalism by Media House


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Here, we compare the levels of churn for each media house over the entire time period specified. The light blue bars above indicate original content while the darker bars below represent churnalised content. Therefore the larger the dark bars in the graph, the higher the proportion of articles that were deemed ‘churnalised’ for the given period.



Top 10 Highest/Lowest Levels of Churnalism by Journalist/Author


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The above graphic compares the volume of churnalised content vs original content per individual journalist. Here, we are looking at the levels of churnalism for each individual journalist/author over the time period specified.

The term ‘level of churnalism’ can be defined as the quantity of articles that qualify as ‘churnalised’ in a given period of time compared to the total quantity of articles for that given period of time.



Media House churnalism sources


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The above graphic shows the relationships between original sources and churnalised stories, as published by media houses. Essentially, we are looking at who is copying who? For example, if one media house has churnalised articles, where did the original content come from? The thickness of the connecting lines represents the quantity of copied articles. From this, we can therefore see the relative contributions that some media house’s original stories make to other media house’s churnalism.